The Philadelphia Trumpet

The Philadelphia Trumpet news magazine presents current events in connection with Bible prophecy. The Trumpet traces its roots back to a previous magazine, the Plain Truth. Editor Herbert Armstrong founded the Plain Truth in 1934 with a similar purpose: to highlight correlations between modern world news and passages in the Bible. In 1985, the Plain Truth peaked with a circulation of 8.4 million in seven languages. One out of every 48 Americans received the magazine. Like the Plain Truth, the Trumpet has been continuously been available completely free of charge or solicitation.

After Herbert Armstrong died, the Plain Truth changed focus and fell drastically in circulation. In Edmond, Okla., Gerald Flurry decided to pick up where the Plain Truth left off and published the first issue of the Philadelphia Trumpet in 1990. The inaugural February 12 edition originated as a simple, six-page, black-and-white document. Since volume 1, number 1, the publication has expanded to a 40-page, full-color, glossy magazine published 10 times per year. The magazine now has a circulation of 255,000. It contains no outside advertising. Quarterly editions of the Trumpet are available in four languages: Spanish, Italian, German and French.

The Trumpet’s editorial position focuses on four major trends that appear in the Bible and in modern headlines: Iran dominating the Middle East, Germany leading a European superpower, Russia and China uniting militarily, and Anglo-Saxon (America, Britain, etc.) nations weakening. The Trumpet also expects the Catholic Church to regain some of its Protestant split-offs and combine with Germany to form another iteration of the historic Holy Roman Empire.

Trumpet articles include analysis of German politics, the German military, European Union politics, Iranian politics, Iranian ideology, Russian-Chinese trade and military cooperation, American national security, and American and British immorality, among other topics. Cover stories have included titles like, “Is Germany’s New Charlamagne About to Appear?” “President Obama’s Cairo Speech” “How It Will Shake the Nations,” “The War on Family,” “Will Christ Ever Return?” “Are We in the Last Days?” “America’s Financial 9/11,” “Why Weather Is Punishing Us,” “How to Protect Your Sexual Health,” “Morality War,” “Democratic Victory” “Dangerous Turn for America?” “Lighting Islam’s Fuse,” “The Siege of Jerualem,” “Russian Election Frightens Europe” and “Germany in Crisis.”

The Trumpet print edition is supplemented by an online presence. The website is updated multiple times daily, and attracts an average of 285,000 visitors per month. TheTrumpet.com features news and analysis articles similar to the print edition; daily columns; a daily blog; and special sections on living, society, and economy. Visitors to the site can stream or download video from Trumpet editor in chief Gerald Flurry. The front page also promotes available books and booklets offered free by the Trumpet’s publisher, the Philadelphia Church of God. TheTrumpet.com visitors can read online, download or request hard copies of over 60 complete titles and Trumpet print edition back issues from 1998 to the present. Like the print edition, all of theTrumpet.com offerings are completely free of charge.

Gerald Flurry founded the Philadelphia Church of God in 1989. Mr. Flurry is also the face of the Key of David television program and is the editor in chief of the Trumpet news magazine.

Source by Adrianna Noton

Buying a Used Saxophone: Things to Consider When Buying a Used Saxophone

In buying a used saxophone, the purchaser must take into account a number of considerations which emphasize the value of the price or amount paid as well as the purpose for which the saxophone is purchased.

There are generally four types of saxophones available. The soprano saxophone, which has the highest pitch among the other saxophones, is considered as the least “user friendly” and is the most difficult to play.  Therefore, beginners are recommended to shun away from purchasing a soprano saxophone for practice.  The alto saxophone is recommended as the best practice saxophone for beginners and is most commonly used in school bands.  The third, the tenor saxophone is perfect for jazz tunes as well as some rock music.    The baritone saxophone is the biggest and is very heavy that people who use the instruments will have to put some harness to support the instrument while they play.

A person who is buying a used saxophone must first determine the purpose for which the instrument is to be purchased.  If he intends to practice and play the instrument as a beginner, then the alto saxophone would be the choice for him.  It is therefore important to remember that it should not be the case that just because the used saxophone is sold at a very affordable rate one may already rush in buying the instrument.  He may have the saxophone at the best price but it will not do him any good if he cannot maximize the use of the instrument because it does not best serve his purpose.  Simply put, it is not a good choice for a beginner to purchase a soprano saxophone even if the price is reasonably low.  Thus, discriminating according to the types of saxophone and in accordance with the use and purpose for buying the instrument is always a good start in buying a used saxophone.

Second would be the price.  Although used saxophones are expected to be cheaper than new ones, an extremely cheap saxophone may hint at the instrument’s poor and unflattering quality – though not necessarily.  Nevertheless, used saxophones may also be sold at a price only slightly lower than the price for other brand new saxophones.  This may be due to several factors: the saxophone’s high quality, brand, make and model.  Thus even at that price, the used saxophone may still be worth buying.  This implies that buying a used saxophone also entails a consideration of the brand, make and model of the instrument.

Most importantly, in buying a used saxophone, one must never hesitate to ask questions about the saxophone.  It is advisable to ask as many questions as one can pertain to the “history” of the saxophone such as: how was it used in the past?  How often was it used?  Had it even been repaired?  When was the last time it had been repaired?  How long has it been since it was first purchased?  Questions like these will help a person decide whether or not he is amenable to buying a used saxophone.  One may also inquire why the saxophone is being sold.

Finally, it is wise to play the saxophone first to test first-hand the sound, the tone, and the quality of the instrument before entering into the deal of buying the saxophone.  In case one is a beginner and does not yet know how to play the instrument, bringing someone who knows how to play the instrument along would be practical and reasonable.

Source by William Thompson

Atlanta Artist’s Paintings Celebrate The Jazz Experience

As a painter, Corey Barksdale’s work is continually inspired by jazz. “It frees me to do what I feel when I’m painting,” Barksdale says. When he’s in the studio creating, he often listens to jazz greats like Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and John Coltrane. The result is a stunning collection of more than 30 paintings that celebrate the jazz experience. 

“Coltrane is at the top of my list when it comes to jazz musicians,” says Barksdale. A Coltrane recording he particularly enjoys is Africa. “Coltrane is improvisational in the piece, but he has structure in his sound. I like the freedom that he has when he’s playing Africa. It’s rhythmic and free.”

Barksdale admires Miles Davis with equal measure for his rawness. “Davis was into experimenting and trying different things with his sound. He was a catalyst for other musicians and he was a pioneer in his time, all without commercializing the music.”

So what is it about jazz that inspires Barksdale’s creativity as a painter? “I love the improvisation of jazz musicians from the ‘50s and ‘60s. There was a lot of experimentation going on. In much the same way, I want to create something totally new with my paintings each time – to be different in the way I portray certain subjects.” 

Barksdale clearly appreciates traditional jazz artists – the Jazz Crusaders and Sonny Rollins included – but he also gets a certain amount of inspiration from legendary contemporaries like Joe Sample and David Sanborn. 

Of all his paintings, his personal favorite is one he’s entitled Jazz Reflections. “The painting is of six guys playing various horn instruments, a bass and piano. It’s one of my favorites because it gives off the vibe of what it’s like being in a jazz club,” explains Barksdale, an Atlanta College of Art graduate. Many of Barksdale’s oil paintings are an infusion of vivid colors tinged with earth tones. His choice colors, a sky blue and a rich orange – almost like Georgia clay with a hint of brown – are used with bold strokes throughout his collection.

“Ultimately, I want individuals to feel what I felt at the time I produced a piece. And whatever the scene happens to be in a painting, I want them to look beyond that and find other things in the painting they can relate to. It’s my attempt to connect on a more personal level.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGQP-jAFY7M



Source by Corey BarksdalePhoto by SPakhrin

Acoustic Guitar Solo Instrumentals

Acoustic guitar solos make up a slice of a musical genre that has all but vanished from popular music – instrumentals. By instrumentals I mean music that is composed and played by a human using musical instruments rather than techno instrumentals that may not be composed and played in the traditional way. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. I just thought it might be useful for some guitar players to take a quick look at the part the acoustic guitar has played in instrumental music. After all the acoustic guitar is the instrument that is always ready for us to pick up and express our feelings on. Plus it has the added advantage in that it does not disturb our family and neighbors too much.

 The classical guitar is the original guitar in the form that is familiar to us. The electric guitar, the steel string acoustic, the resonator guitars all descended from the nylon string classical guitar. Classical guitar as a genre is simply classical music played on the guitar. It can get quite sophisticated and technically demanding but there are simple classical guitar pieces available on the net in musical notation or tabs that any guitar player with a basic fingerstyle technique could find very rewarding to play. Estudio in C by Dionisio Aguado and Gavotte En Rondeau – Lute Suite No 4 in E by J.S. Bach are two examples that I have seen in tab form.

If you are interested in listening to classical guitar music, John Williams and Julian Bream both have clips on YouTube and other video sites but do not restrict yourself to well-known names – there are many great acoustic instrumental clips by amateur guitarists.

You might be surprised to know that Flamenco guitar as a solo instrument is a fairly new arrival on the music scene. The guitar has been an accompaniment for singers and dancers for many years but solo guitarists have only been making their presence felt since the mid-twentieth century. The early Flamenco guitar players like Ramon Montoya produced music that would probably hold little interest for a modern non-Spanish audience but you will find video clips by masters of the 1950’s and ’60’ like Sabicas and Diego Del Gastor as well as modern virtuoso guitarists like Paco De Lucia, Serranito, Paco Pena and Vincente Amigo.

We all like to listen and explore the sounds of our guitars and the folk music boom of the nineteen sixties was a breeding ground for many new guitarists who loved to experiment with acoustic guitar instrumental solos. Possibly the most popular guitar solo from this genre was “Anji” by am extremely influential guitarist named Davy Graham. This piece was recorded by Paul Simon on an early Simon And Garfunkel album and Davy Graham’s “She moved thru’ the Bizarre/Blue Raga” was heavily adapted (or adopted) by Jimmy Page for the Led Zeppelin number, “White Summer”. Graham was responsible for the popularization of the DADGAD guitar tuning which introduced guitar players to the possibilities of playing bass accompaniment on open strings while improvising or composing tunes on the treble strings.

Well, I hope I the names I have given you will help you to find acoustic guitar solos and soloists you have never heard before. Remember if you any music you see played on one of the video sites is probably available somewhere in guitar tabs so do not be afraid to go hunting for them.



Source by Ricky SharplesPhoto by Alan Klim

Baritone horn


Construction and general characteristics

Key

The baritone is pitched in concert B, meaning that when no valves are in use the instrument will produce partials of the B harmonic series. Music for the baritone horn can be written on both the bass clef and the treble clef. When reading from the bass clef, the baritone horn is a non-transposing instrument. However, when reading from the treble clef, it can become a transposing instrument, where the C on the horn is the concert B, with the fingerings matching those of the trumpet or can continue to be played as a non-transposing instrument by continuing to play the same fingerings as played in the lower octave.

The baritone is part of the low brass section of the band.

Tone

The baritone has a fairly mellow timbre in between the bright sounds of the trombone and the more mellow tone of the euphonium.

Distinguishing the Baritone from the Euphonium

Although both baritone and euphonium produce partials of the B harmonic series, and both have a nine-foot-long main tube, the baritone has a smaller and more cylindrical bore while the euphonium has a larger and more conical bore. The baritone horn also has a tighter wrap and a far smaller bell, and is thus physically smaller. The euphonium has a more solid, bassy timbre.

There is some confusion of nomenclature in the United States between true baritones and euphoniums, in part due to the old practice of American euphonium manufacturers calling their professional models by their proper names, and branding entry-level student models as baritones. This practice has nearly stopped. Another common misconception is that the three-valve instrument is a baritone and that the four-valve instrument a euphonium. True baritone horns are sometimes called “British-bore Baritones” in the US to avoid this confusion.

A so-called American baritone, featuring three valves on the front of the instrument and a curved forward-pointing bell, was common in American school bands throughout most of the twentieth century. While this instrument is in reality a conical-cylindrical bore hybrid, neither truly euphonium nor baritone, it was almost universally labeled a “baritone” by both band directors and composers.[citation needed]

Marching baritone

Marching baritone

Marching baritone (center) in Ottrott

Within Drum and Bugle Corps (and many marching bands), the instrument referred to as a baritone is a bugle in the key of B that is usually played by trombonists, euphoniumists, or concert baritonists. It has 3 valves and a front-facing bell and is the tenor voice of a drum corps, below the high sopranos and altos, and above the low contras. Although it is referred to as a baritone, it bears hardly any resemblance to its concert namesake. It has a mellow tone similar to the tenor trumpet. There also exists a marching version of the euphonium; the primary differences between the two are nearly the same as their concert counterparts.

Drum and bugle corps

Up until 1977, baritone bugles, as with all bugles at the time, were restricted to one horizontal piston valve and one rotary valve. That year, the Drum Corps International rules congress passed a rule allowing 2 vertical piston valves. The rules were amended once more in 1989 permitting the addition of a third valve.

From the 1950s until 2000, all drum and bugle corps were required to use instruments pitched in the key of G. That year, Drum Corps International changed its rules again, allowing instruments in any key, with most other major organizations (e.g. Drum Corps Associates) following suit soon after. Since this change, the standard baritone has been the instrument pitched in B.

Marching band

Within the high school and college marching band activity, marching baritones are nearly always present to facilitate concert baritone (and sometimes euphonium) players. In some ensembles, trombones are not used, in which case baritones also provide an alternative for trombonists who can’t bring their instrument onto the marching field.

References

^ a b Robert Donington, “The Instruments of Music”, (pp113 ffThe Family of Bugles) 2nd ED., Methuen London 1962

^ a b Apel, Willi (1969), Harvard Dictionary of Music, Cambridge:: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1972., pp. 105110 

http://home.earthlink.net/~tenorhorn/euphhistory.html Retrieved on 29 January 2008

http://lowbrassnmore.com/euponiumhistory.htm Retrieved on 29 January 2008

http://www.nikknakks.net/euphonium/ Retrieved on 29 January 2008

http://www.dwerden.com/emg/ Retrieved on 29 January 2008

Categories: Brass instruments | B-flat instrumentsHidden categories: All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements from February 2010 | Articles with unsourced statements from January 2008


Source by qoqoPhoto by magicatwork Photo by Sadie Hernandez

Understanding the Essence and True Meaning of the Sounds of Shofars

 Shofars have been part of Jewish religion and culture since the ancient times. The horn of shofar is the most recognizable symbol of sacred rituals and important events in Jewish life. Among all the types of shofar, it is the ram shofar horn that is the most dominant type as it symbolizes the great sacrifice of Abraham because of his unwavering faith in God. Shofar blowing is used to make different types of distinct shofar sounds which are commonly heard during religious events like the Rosh Hashana and the Yom Kippur. For one to get the most appropriate sounds from the horn, it is essential that one uses the right piece with the requisite skill needed to produce the right notes and sounds.  

Only a few can truly achieve the ultimate performance of producing the perfect sounds and notes from shofars, be it from the horn of a ram or any other horned animal. This one interesting footnote about the horn is even documented in the Talmud where the blowing of the shofarot is considered a skill and not just a result of hard work. In order to perfect the use of the shofarot, one has to dedicate sufficient time and effort to practice and hone the skills in playing with the shofarot. To become an accomplished ba’al tekiah, one has to select the perfect shofarot that will produce best results. One should not limit one’s choice based on the appearance and size. Before one can even make a short list of choice shofars, he should first learn how to play with the shofarot to ascertain the experience one gets in playing the shofarot.

As differentiated from the other traditional instruments, the shofars uses a mouthpiece that enhances the sound and notes that can be produced while playing. Developing your skill in blowing the shofarot requires that you are adept at using your lips and tongue to alter the notes and tunes produced when blowing the shofarot. It is better for you to use two fingers to handle the shofars. The tighter you are able to press your lips to the mouthpiece, the higher the notes that you are able to produce. Make sure that you don’t get your saliva into the shofarot as this will create a broken and croaky sound.

The best way to start playing with the shofarot is by moisturizing the lips at the right portion of the farthest corner of the mouth while firmly holding the shofarot before blowing. Before blowing the shofarot, make sure that your lips are firmly pressed to the mouthpiece and when you think that you are set to play, blow air through the instrument. The sound produced must firm and powerful. For sound endurance, draw air straight from your chest and release the air in a regulated manner.

 Once you are able to comfortably produce varied sounds and notes with your shofarot, then you are all set to learn all three sounds required in Rosh Hashanah. These sounds are the tekiah, shevarim and the teruah.



Source by JewisheartPhoto by FotoGuy 49057

Shofar Sounds

The fact that the shofar has been used since antiquity in the marking of sacred rituals has largely contributed to the mystery that surrounds the instrument. Of all types of shofar, the rams horn shofar is the most preferred ideally because it was a ram that was sacrificially slaughtered by the patriarch Abraham instead of his son Isaac. The shofar is used to make a number of dedicated shofar sounds but before we get into these it would be prudent to learn how to blow this instrument.

Only a few persons wholly excel in the masterful blowing of a shofar, be it the ram’s horn shofar or that made from another type of horn. This fact is even supported in the Talmud where blowing the shofar is recognized as being a skill and not hard work. To gain mastery you will be required to dedicate adequate time for practice. The first step for anyone who intends to become a ba’al tekiah is to select the type of shofar that will best suit them. Rather than pegging the choice on aspects of appearance and size you should consider the feel of the shofar and the manner in which it sounds.

The shofar, unlike other conventional instruments, only has a mouthpiece and this is the only point at which you can alter the notes produced. This calls for adeptness in the use of both the lips and tongue. The best shofar for any individual will be that whose mouthpiece allows for a comfortable positioning of the lips. Get ready to make a note now.

Start by moistening your lips at the farthest right-hand corner and hold the ram’s horn shofar firmly at this point. At this point your lips should be tightly sealed. When you feel ready, create a tiny hole (in the lips) against the shofar and then forcefully blow air into the instrument. To do this well, assume that you want to make a Bronx cheer. The resulting sound if perfectly executed should be powerful and bright. For longevity, fill your chest with enough breath and then let this out in a controlled manner. You can use two fingers to steady the ram’s horn shofar next to the lips. The tighter your lips are, the higher the pitch that will be produced. Always ensure that you don’t let excessive saliva into the shofar as this will serve to make the sound croaky.

Having learnt how to produce notes on the shofar it is time that we learn about the three different sounds that are significant to Rosh Hashana. The first of these is the Tekiah and it is denoted by a single, straight and prolonged blast. The main concept of Rosh Hashana is to appreciate that the Almighty God is the supreme King of the entire Universe. When the ram’s horn shofar produces the Tekiah it denotes God’s coronation as King. This is also an individual call for all faithful to help each other in recognizing God’s supremacy.

For the Shevarim sound, the shofar produces three medium blasts in a wailing mood. This sound depicts the disappointment of persons who have failed to make the most of their full potential in a past year. The Shevarim stirs people to aim higher in the New Year by making the most of the opportunities available to them.

The final sound is the Teruah. These are nine blasts made in rapid succession. They are meant to act like a spiritual alarm clock that rouses people from spiritual slumber. Here the shofar enforces a mentality of clarity, focus, and commitment.



Source by SEO israelPhoto by glass.dimly

Learning how to blow a Shofar

The fact that the Shofars have been used since antiquity in the marking of sacred rituals has largely contributed to the mystery that surrounds the instrument. Of all types of Shofar, the ram’s horn Shofar is the most preferred ideally because it was a ram that was sacrificially slaughtered by the patriarch Abraham instead of his son Isaac. The Shofar is used to make a number of dedicated sounds but before we get into these it would be prudent to learn how to blow this instrument.

Only a few persons wholly excel in the masterful blowing of a Shofar, be it the ram’s horn Shofar or that made from another type of horn. This fact is even supported in the Talmud where blowing the Shofar is recognized as being a skill and not hard work. To gain mastery you will be required to dedicate adequate time for practice. The first step for anyone who intends to become a ba’al tekiah is to select the type of Shofar that will best suit them. Rather than pegging the choice on aspects of appearance and size you should consider the feel of the Shofar and the manner in which it sounds.

The Shofar, unlike other conventional instruments, only has a mouthpiece and this is the only point at which you can alter the notes produced. This calls for adeptness in the use of both the lips and tongue. The best Shofar for any individual will be that whose mouthpiece allows for a comfortable positioning of the lips. Get ready to make a note now.

Start by moistening your lips at the farthest right-hand corner and hold the ram’s horn Shofar firmly at this point. At this point your lips should be tightly sealed. When you feel ready, create a tiny hole (in the lips) against the Shofar and then forcefully blow air into the instrument. To do this well, assume that you want to make a Bronx cheer. The resulting sound if perfectly executed should be powerful and bright. For longevity, fill your chest with enough breath and then let this out in a controlled manner. You can use two fingers to steady the ram’s horn Shofar next to the lips. The tighter your lips are, the higher the pitch that will be produced. Always ensure that you don’t let excessive saliva into the Shofar as this will serve to make the sound croaky.

Having learnt how to produce notes on the Shofar it is time that we learn about the three different sounds that are significant to Rosh Hashana. The first of these is the Tekiah and it is denoted by a single, straight and prolonged blast. The main concept of Rosh Hashana is to appreciate that the Almighty God is the supreme King of the entire Universe. When the Rams Horn Shofar produces the Tekiah it denotes God’s coronation as King. This is also an individual call for all faithful to help each other in recognizing God’s supremacy.

For the Shevarim sound, the Shofar produces three medium blasts in a wailing mood. This sound depicts the disappointment of persons who have failed to make the most of their full potential in a past year. The Shevarim stirs people to aim higher in the New Year by making the most of the opportunities available to them. The final sound is the Teruah. These are nine blasts made in rapid succession. They are meant to act like a spiritual alarm clock that rouses people from spiritual slumber. Here the Shofar enforces a mentality of clarity, focus, and commitment.



Source by Baltinester BrosPhoto by slgckgc

The History And Characteristics Of The Jazz Combo

Jazz is an American art form whose roots date back to the mid-19th century slave songs and chants. The early 20th century saw the art form blossom as instrumental music in the southern United States, mainly along the Mississippi river and specifically New Orleans, Louisiana.

Early instrumental jazz combos of New Orleans varied in instrumentation. More often than not, these early jazz groups generally consisted of trumpet, clarinet, trombone, tuba and drums. This instrumentation became what is known as the “dixieland” combo, making its way up the Mississippi river to Chicago where the music became popularized by jazz greats such as Louis Armstrong.

Dixieland combos can be thought of as groups that play “polyphonic” improvisational music. Each instrument is independent of every other instrument, with each player creating separate musical improvisations based on known melodies, or “tunes” of the day.

The players of these early jazz combos each had a separate role within the group. The trumpet player was depended upon to state the melody of the song, while the clarinet would improvise complex lines above him. The trombonists role was to improvise or “fill in” the middle register with lines and notes that were essential to the chord changes of the song itself. The tuba player (or bass player) generally laid down root notes (and 5ths) of each chord on beats 1 and 3 of each measure. The tuba served as the harmonic anchor for the group. Lastly, it was the drummers role to keep everyone together by keeping a steady beat throughout the entirety of the song.

As jazz music developed throughout the 1940s and 1950s, jazz combo instrumentation began to become more standardized. The jazz “quintet” and “sextet” became very popular during this time. The quintet consisted of trumpet and alto (or tenor) sax as the main melodic instruments while the rhythm section (piano, bass and drums) took care of rhythm and harmony.

The sextet added a trombone to form what essentially was a three horn front line, with rhythm section accompaniment. The extra melodic instrument of the sextet made it possible for the horns to add more harmonic depth to the sound of the group. Each instrument had a role not only as a melodic voice, but also as an integral component of the harmonic structure as well.

Modern jazz combos consist of a variety of instrumentation – 4, 5 horn combos are common place. As the group grows in size however, the name “combo” is replaced by “band” or “little big band”.

The jazz combo has provided a musical and creative outlet for countless musicians over the last 100 years. The jazz combo continues to provide jazz musicians the opportunity to work together to make music not only as a group but also to develop their own voice as individual jazz improvisers. It is, and probably always will be, the perfect vehicle for learning the art of jazz improvisation.



Source by James P Martin

The Musical Dynamics of The Orchestra

The great pipe organs are marvels for variety of tonal coloring. The pipe organ manual has more “stops” to pull and more gadgets to work than the dash of an airplane or the control room of a submarine.

But the orchestra excels even the pipe organ in the variety of beauty of its tonal coloring and in the amazing wealth of its musical effects. The orchestra conductor can “pull stops” on the orchestra that are the envy of the organist and the despair of the organ builder.

In the lower regions he can call out the ominous thunder of the tympani, the sonorous boom of the tuba, the Plutonic mumble of the bassoon, the dark, muffled zoom of the string bass, or the sepulchral moaning of the bass clarinet.

To carry the melody or tell the story of the composition, the conductor can call upon the versatile virtuoso violin, the coloratura-soprano flute, the lyric-soprano oboe, the dramatic-soprano clarinet or the martial trumpet and piccolo.

For middle voices he can choose the tenor trombone or viola, the English horn or alto clarinet, the French horn or cello. To beat a rhythm or set a tempo or punctuate a phrase, the conductor may choose among the many varieties of drums and bells and chimes, or call upon the strings to play pizzicato or the trumpets to play staccato.

The high harmonics of the strings can picture the ethereal realms of heaven, or the brass and the battery can blast the ^hearing with the echoes of hell. The flutes and oboes can paint a Corot scene of pastoral contentment, the trumpets and trombones can fan our warring spirit to white heat, the French horns can call from Alpine peak to Alpine peak, or the bassoon can perform the antics of the clown and picture the zigzag, uncertain course of the drunkard. The clarinets can dance the swift, sgrightly folk dance, the drums and piccolo can beat the cadence of marching armies. Or the slow, measured beat of the tympani and the low, muffled swish of the string bass can pace the funeral march. There is nothing, apparently, beyond the capacity of this greatest of all musical instruments the symphony orchestra.

The symphony is composed of about a hundred instruments and has a range of about a hundred semitones. Since the sound limits of the human ear are about 125 semitones, the symphony orchestra utilizes about four fifths of the range of human hearing.

The lower threshold of hearing is usually set at sixteen vibrations per second, and while the pipe organ sometimes uses this tone, four octaves below Middle C, the lowest note used in the symphony is the Bb in the fourth octave below Middle C, sounded by the giant contrabass tuba and having twenty-nine and a fraction vibrations per second.



Source by Malcolm Blake

Protec Cases Custom Cases For Your Musical Instruments

There are few things you value the most and you would want it to last for a lifetime. One such treasured possession is your musical instruments. In order to protect your musical gears from scratches and other damages, you definitely need quality cases. Instrument cases are the best way to protect your musical instruments from exterior damage.

When it comes to cases for music instruments, Protec cases are among the best. Hyson Music has a remarkable collection of Protec musical instrument cases, just for you. They offer Protec cases for flutes, saxophones, trumpets, trombones, French horns, bassoons, and mouthpieces. Protec musical instrument cases come in a variety of options like swivel wheels, locks, pockets, and more.

The popular Protec Pro Pac clarinet case and the Protec Slimline Pro Pac case offer storage space for almost everything that you need to carry. These extremely lightweight frames are lined with soft velvoa for added protection. Convert these music instrument bags

The Protec PB316CT Contoured French Horn PRO PAC Case is designed to house double and large wrap horns. With a Velcro quick lock and protective foam padding, this case is must have accessory for any musicians. Additional features include roomy exterior pocket and built-in organizer to hold pens, keys, and small accessories. Stylish yet functional, Protec flute case covers come with attractive features that include soft padding, zipper closure, exterior pocket, shoulder strap, and more. The Protec Z-Series Flute Carrying Bag is another marvelous case that has a rugged ballistic exterior and available in black, blue, and silver.

Carry your music instruments with the utmost protection and quality using Protec musical instrument cases from Hyson Music.



Source by hysonmusicPhoto by garryknight

The Mambo: The Cuban Rhythm That Makes Feet Dance

The mambo is a Cuban genre of music and dance that combines traditional Cuban music with the highly Americanized forms of swing and big band.

It’s a very syncopated type of music, a style that finds its footing in rhythm as opposed to melody (though melody, of course, plays its role). Mambo is always played in 4/4 time and uses an amalgamation of American big band instruments and those found in traditional Latin styles; mambo bands will typically have a horn section in a addition to the very percussive bongos, timbales and congas.

Though mambo is a decidedly Cuban style, it’s roots are far more European than Latin. The very first mambo was based heavily on English and French ballroom dancing music, and it was rarely intended for dancing. Though it certainly carried an inherent dance ability, early mambo was music for the sake of music; no dance had been assigned to it, nor did it seem like one would be.

The early mambo thrived as a piece of music alone until the 1940s when Damaso Perez Prado, a Cuban bandleader, began specializing in the form. His version of the mambo brought people to their feet and led to the famous mambo dance’s creation. Prado is also credited with bringing mambo music and it’s accompanying dance to the United States, though the form sustained a bit of a shift as a result of the cultural change. Prado altered the mambo to make it slightly more commercial, more ready for 1950s American consumption, and watched the form become an almost instant craze. Prado’s role in composing and popularizing the form earned him the title “Mambo King.”

Typical instruments used in mambo music are the conga drum, the bongo, timbales, claves, and a mixture of band instruments including the trumpet, trombone, saxaphone, bass (usually upright bass, but sometimes an electric bass) and the piano. It is this mixture of Cuban rhythmic instruments and instruments used in big band jazz that gives the mambo it’s distinctive sound.

Some typical mambo songs include “Papa Loves Mambo”, “I Saw Mommy Do The Mambo”, “Mambo Italiano” and “They Were Doin’ The Mambo”.

Rhythmically it is similar to, but not identical to, other Latin-American rhythms such as the samba, tango, bossa nova, beguine, and others, but is unique enough to be instantly identifiable as a mambo.

But like most instant crazes, mambo faded out of American popularity nearly as quickly as it arrived. Though the form is still heard and danced today, it morphed into a variety of different styles, including the pachanga, a mambo-like dance that also faded quickly. Mambo recently saw a resurgence of popularity in the late 1990s with a rock and roll based mambo revival, but that too was extremely short-lived.



Source by Duane ShinnPhoto by randomidea